Useful Info

Radon
Radon comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water which then releases radioactive gas into the air you breathe, causing a potential health risk to you and your family. Radon gas can be found just about anywhere, but is more wide spread in the upper half of the United States. Radon is a cancer causing radioactive gas. You cannot see, smell or taste it. When you breathe air-containing radon, you increase your risk of getting lung cancer. The Surgeon General has warned that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer. The EPA’s position on the matter is that all homes should be tested for radon gas exposure, and all homes testing over 4.0 pCi/L should be fixed.

You can fix a radon gas problem
If you find that you have high radon levels, there are ways to fix a radon problem. Even very high levels can be reduced to acceptable levels. Please call your local radon mitigation company for more information.

Molds
Molds are part of the natural environment in the outdoors. But indoors, mold growth should be avoided. Molds reproduce by means of tiny spores; the spores are invisible to the naked eye and float through outdoor and indoor air. Mold may begin growing indoors when mold spores land on surfaces that are wet. There are many types of mold, and none of them will grow without water or moisture.

Molds are usually not a problem indoors, unless mold spores land on a wet or damp spot and begin growing. Molds have the potential to cause health problems. Molds produce allergens (substances that can cause allergic reactions), irritants, and in some cases, potentially toxic substances (mycotoxins). Inhaling or touching mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. Allergic responses include hay fever-type symptoms, such as sneezing, runny nose, red eyes, and skin rash (dermatitis). Allergic reactions to mold are common. They can be immediate or delayed. Molds can also cause asthma attacks in people with asthma who are allergic to mold. In addition, mold exposure can irritate the eyes, skin, nose, throat, and lungs of both mold-allergic and non-allergic people. Symptoms other than the allergic and irritant types are not commonly reported as a result of inhaling mold. Research on mold and health effects is ongoing. It is impossible to get rid of all mold and mold spores indoors; some mold spores will be found floating through the air and in house dust. The mold spores will not grow if moisture is not present. Indoor mold growth can and should be prevented or controlled by controlling moisture indoors. If there is mold growth in your home, you must clean up the mold and fix the water problem. If you clean up the mold, but don’t fix the water problem, then, most likely, the mold problem will come back.